Pet Portrait Artist Julie Palmer

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Poisonous Plants - Common Garden Plants That Can Kill Your Dog

 

Before you buy your first dog, you may want to check out your backyard. As you are looking at your landscape and garden, picturing your new dog playing around, a smile comes to your face.

The green lawn is immaculate, the plants and shrubs are beginning to blossom. There is a brand new dog house in the corner of the garden. It’s freshly painted and the dog enters and exits as he pleases. An oleander leaf begins to fall and lands squarely in the dog’s water dish. The weather is perfect, everything is perfect.

This is a beautiful scene, relaxed, serene, natural, and safe?

Not so fast!

While this dream may seem amazingly perfect, realistically it is very deadly. The dream becomes a nightmare when your dog takes a drink from that water dish with an oleander leaf and dies.

In North America alone, there are almost a thousand species of plants that are considered poisonous to dogs and other pets. Veterinarians see dogs all the time for poisoning and often owners put the blame on others.

Experts say that 95% of dogs see veterinarians as a result of poisoning in their own backyard. Beautiful landscapes turn into graveyards filled with deadly plants that are fatal to animals. Curious dogs hiding a bone can come across a plant and if swallowed will quickly turn into a fatal mistake.

Examples of poisonous plants are the autumn crocus plan, Glory Lilies, and the star of Bethlehem. The most popular back yard, poisonous plant is the lily-of-the-valley and is definitely fatal if consumed by a dog.

Owners with a green thumb love having cornflower, black eyed Susan, golden glow, sweat peas, and bleeding heart. All of these plants spell out impending doom if they come across any of your pets.

I think we all know the “Christmas Plant,” the poinsettia. It is one of the most popular plants around, but if a child would happen to swallow just one leaf they would face most certain death.

Article provided by Jerry Kelley of ohmydogsupplies.com, the top spot to buy hats and neckwear for dogs online.

 
 

All images are copyright 2001 to 2017 Julie Palmer. Portrait images must not be reproduced in any form without the express permission of the copyright holder.

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