Pet Portrait Artist Julie Palmer

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North American Dog Breeds

 

North America has contributed many different breeds to the dog world. Some of them are accepted by the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC), some by the American Kennel Club (AKC) and some have not yet been accorded a place in either breeders’ club. Over time, several breeds have found their way into the registration books. Among these have been members of the Sporting Dogs Group.

Sporting Dogs

American Cocker Spaniel.

This dog is referred to as a Cocker Spaniel. Outside the United States, this dog is called the American Cocker Spaniel to differentiate it from the English Cocker Spaniel. The English Cocker Spaniel is the ancestor of the American Cocker Spaniel. This ancestor was bred selectively since the 1880s to arrive at the breed we recognize today.

The American cocker Spaniel is an all-round hunting dog. This canine has a luxurious coat requiring frequent brushing. The temperament is happy. Cocker Spaniels are happy, enthusiastic and energetic. A good watchdog, the breed is an affectionate pet. The canine is best for a single owner and its smaller size is adaptable to an elderly individual.

American Water Spaniel

The American Water Spaniel evolved in the midwest sometime in the 19th century. This breed is an all-round dog. The dog is also an all-weather hunting dog. The breed definitely lives up to the name.

The American Water Spaniel is a clever canine. The dog is friendly and charming. This is a high-energy dog. Sturdy and muscular, the American Water spaniel requires lots of exercise.
Chesapeake Bay Retriever

This dog is said to evolve from the Canadian Newfoundland crossed with local sporting dogs. The result is a powerful swimmer and a dedicated duck retriever. The breed is helped in this these tasks. The canine has a dense undercoat and waterproofed coat.

With training and socialization, the Chesapeake Bay Retriever makes a wonderful family dog.
They are not inclined to be fond of strangers of any size or gender. The breed is intelligent but reserved. This is not a dog for the lazy. The Chesapeake Bay Retriever requires plenty of exercise and training.

Labrador Retriever

The Labrador Retriever is a made-in-Canada canine. A descendant of the also Canadian Newfoundland Dog, the Labrador is known worldwide for its temperament. The breed is a field dog, a family dog and a water dog.

Labradors are energetic. They are reliable, loyal, obedient and loving. They require love and exercise in equal parts. Labradors are also mooches, easily motivated by food. These dogs can quickly become fat and lazy if overfed and not exercised.

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

The Nova Scotia Duck Trolling Dog hails from Nova Scotia, Canada. It can only be called a “water fowl specialist.” The dog is a tolling breed. In other words, through its actions and behavior, the dog draws water fowl out into the open for hunters to shoot.

This powerful medium-sized dog is intelligent. A keen worker with a medium-long coat, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a fine family pet. The coat requires frequent brushing. The dog needs a lot of exercise. Obedience work is a must if you want to keep the dog content and under control.

Newfoundland

Newfoundland Dogs are Canadian in origin. These gentle giant canines have water-resistant coats. Newfoundland Dogs are characterized as friendly and easy-going. Water loving animals, they need supervision at the best of times.

Newfoundland Dogs are powerful dogs. Yet, in spite of their shambling and gargantuan size, they are amazingly gentle with children. This is truly a family dog. They demand attention to their coat but not copious amounts of exercise.

Conclusion

There are many dogs who make Canada and the United States their home. Made-in-North America dogs comprise a popular sector of this motley crew. In Part 3 of this article, the focus is on the Herding, Hound and Terrier categories.

Content provided by Erica Fuss of www.ohmydogsupplies.com, check out our awesome variety of personalized dog beds online.

 
 

All images are copyright 2001 to 2017 Julie Palmer. Portrait images must not be reproduced in any form without the express permission of the copyright holder.

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